People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) have doubled-down on their criticism of Cyril Ramaphosa this week, after they allegedly recorded a group of ‘trophy hunting rangers’ speaking about the president’s links to their operation.

Ramaphosa accused of ‘profiting’ from trophy hunting

The office of the presidency has flat-out denied that Ramaphosa’s Phala Phala farm is being marketed for guests to shoot down some of the rarest and most endangered animals in South Africa. Although Cyril’s spokesperson did confirm the property allows for legal hunting expeditions, all connections to ‘unethical activities’ have been rejected:

“The allegations are patently false and are refuted in full. Neither Phala Phala nor President Ramaphosa is engaged in illegal or unethical activities in any form. In the light of allegations that Tsala engages in the hunting of threatened or protected species on other properties, Phala Phala has given notice to Tsala Safaris to terminate the hunting arrangement.”

Presidential officials deny connections to trophy hunting racket.

PETA respond to president’s denial

However, this rebuttal has only enraged PETA further, who released a follow-up statement earlier this week:

  • PETA claim their recording – which the President denied the existence of – has ‘dug a deeper hole’ for Ramaphosa.
  • The animal rights group says that the official response from their presidency is ‘an embarrassment’.
  • By terminating an alleged hunting arrangement with Tsala Safaris, PETA says Cyril has already admitted wrongdoing.

PETA vs Cyril Ramaphosa

The group recently released hidden footage, purportedly taken at the Phala Phala farm, documenting conversations that implicated Cyril Ramaphosa in a lucrative trophy hunting scheme. He stands accused of raking in 50% of all profits raised by gun-toting holidaymakers. However, the presidency is not budging from its steadfast denial.

“Cyril Ramaphosa’s hidden connections and investments in the trophy hunting industry. Footage reveals that Ramaphosa is quietly developing and expanding a trophy hunting property called Diepdrift—stocking it with animals from his own wildlife breeding operation, Phala Phala – and that he owns a 50% stake in Tsala Hunting Safaris.”

“PETA U.S. recorded conversations in which Ramaphosa’s managers admitted that he shares equally in the profits from all hunts conducted through Tsala and spoke of the importance of concealing his involvement. One manager said, ‘We try to keep the president’s name actually out of the hunting thing, to spare him of bad publicity and all of that’.”

PETA Statement

.

Presh JM Reporter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *